The Pledge of Allegiance

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I refused to say the Pledge of Allegiance.  The schools couldn’t legally force me to say it, but they tried to anyway.  Whatever my parents’ faults, they went to bat for me every time.  It was never a question of patriotism for me but a willingness to conform and obey.

At one point my dad announced a great victory: That I’d be allowed to leave out the “God” part. 🤦🏻‍♀️  He’d totally, totally, missed the point.

I don’t ever recall having used the ‘G’ word.  In elementary school I would simply mumble the pledge before I quit entirely.  Something about standing there, chanting in unison without really understanding what it was we were saying just made me super uncomfortable.

When I got older, it became the notion of the Pledge itself — rather than the delivery — that bothered me the most.  I love America, I think it is the greatest country in the world and (despite its many imperfections) that it has the greatest system of government ever conceived.

But I’m not willing to pledge to my allegiance to any state or nation or any symbol thereof.  I believe in loyalty to ideas.  To principles.  And even in junior high my word meant something to me, and I wasn’t about to make any pledge I didn’t mean.

My dad fought hard against the schools to allow me to simply stand for the Pledge.  Even that bothered me because the school was still trampling my 1st Amendment rights by insisting (yes, the SCOTUS has ruled on it), but I since I’d already been standing anyway, I wasn’t about to make a big deal of it.

Even after the administrators acquiesced, I was still prone to getting teachers and substitutes who would try to force me to say it anyway.  It was obnoxious.  They’d try all sorts of tactics, including denouncing me in front of my classmates for “disrespecting our military”.  Which was a disgusting charge.  They didn’t care about the troops.  All they cared about was conformity and obeisance.

I have zero problem with the Pledge being said in schools or public gatherings, but I do have a huge, huge problem with people being illegally forced to say it or subjected to harrassment when they refuse.

As a side note, the history of the Pledge is rather interesting and dripping with irony.  One could half-kiddingly describe Francis Bellamy as a National Socialist.  (Drops to one-quarter kiddingly when you factor in the salute.)

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Ideological Litmus Test

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I find the idea intriguing, but I just don’t see how it would work.

For starters, who would design such a test, and what guarantee would we have that it would be based on core American values when our own people can’t even agree on what those values are or ought to be?

Second, what’s to keep would-be immigrants from simply giving us the appropriate answers?  Even the ones who are either too dumb or too culturally isolated to figure it out themselves could be coached on how to answer.  And there are people both inside and outside this country who would be all too glad to help them defeat such a system.

Chuck and Nancy

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I’d just like to say that I support President Trump 100% on border policy.  The Democrats have been the enemies of national security since the Clinton administration, and they stopped caring about America the day Trump was elected.

Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer are authoritarian leftists who would sooner bring about the destruction of our nation (and blame it on Trump) than compromise their vision of America as a socialist dictatorship ruled by powerful Washington elites.

How did such people come to hold office in the first place, and why for the love of everything that is decent in this world do they keep getting voted back in?  Ignorance. Fear.  Deceit — everything they have accused President Trump of capitalizing upon, and probably a hell of a lot more than that.

“Accuse your enemies of that which you are guilty” is a line Pelosi, Schumer, and the entire Democratic establishment have truly taken to heart.

I’m not a Republican.  I wouldn’t even consider myself a conservative, and I frequently oppose President Trump on matters of policy.  Nevertheless, I have a tremendous amount of respect for President Trump, and I consider him the most valuable ally anyone could ask for in this cold war against the Regressive Left.

I Endorse This Endorsement

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I will be voting for [candidate] because I am tired of American politics being dominated by a #duopoly that has strayed too far from the founding principles of our society.

I will be *enthusiastically* voting for [candidate] because I believe he represents these principles, and that if elected he will remain as accessible to the individual citizens of his district as he has throughout his campaign.

(TRUE FACT: The existence of the incumbent is not a media hoax.)

Make no mistake — [candidate] is not some radical third-party candidate looking to arbitrarily slash government spending and legalize everything short of murder.  On the contrary, Mr. [candidate] is out to make our government operate more efficiently so we can all breathe a little easier.

How does he plan to accomplish this?  Not with empty rhetoric, but by eliminating wasteful spending and redirecting the Federal Government’s focus to federal issues.

(Please refer to Porter4Us.com, particularly the sections marked ‘Fiscal Policy’ and ‘Government Reform’.)

Which is not to say that [candidate] is without a few radical views.  He is, for instance, in favor of Congressional term limits.  (Who will speak for our career politicians?!) 😱  Which is not nearly as startling as his belief that the Second Amendment remains in effect and somehow pertains to private gun ownership.  (Wait, what??) 😱😱

But perhaps most radical of all is Mr. [candidate]’s position on Donald Trump. Directly from his website (TRIGGER WARNING):

“I will neither blindly support or oppose President Trump… I would stand up to President Trump when appropriate and support him on issues we agree on.” 😱😱😱

I will be voting for [candidate] in the upcoming election and hope you will too — if you aren’t too triggered by his radical views.

FACEBOOK: What Supporting Kavanaugh Was Really About

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All right, everyone — listen up, because an astonishing number of you don’t seem to understand the overwhelming support behind Brett Kavanaugh, or how the SCOTUS confirmation process even works.

The President can nominate whomever he damn well pleases, and it’s up to the Senate whether or not to confirm.  There isn’t an ideological litmus test, and it doesn’t matter how “mainstream” a nominee is, because the Supreme Court does not exist to represent YOUR interests OR mine.  The only “interests” it represents are those of the United States Constitution.   (Worth noting: Brett Kavanaugh is an utter caricature of Middle America.)

The only relevant concern is whether the nominee is capable of doing the job.

Think he lacks the experience to fill a seat?  Fine.  Think he doesn’t understand the Constitution, or how to properly apply it?  That’s fine too.  Have concerns about the candidate’s ethics, or do you otherwise question whether he can and will remain objective in his rulings?  Then certainly, Senator, you should vote ‘no’.

But please, all of you screaming your heads off about Roe v. Wade — shut the fuck up already.  You don’t actually believe Trump can be pressured into nominating someone who supports abortion; you’re just looking for an excuse to bitch about Trump.

If you had any serious concerns about Kavanaugh’s confirmation, you belonged taking them to your senator — not taking to the streets like savages or whining about it on social media.

(To anyone who contacted their senator’s office and THEN whined: 👍  But I hope they had the good sense to ignore you unless you actually had something constructive to say.)


Secondly:

I’m tired of all the mischaracterizations of Kavanaugh supporters, and of people reframing the issues around irrelevant topics instead of challenging our arguments directly.

This was NEVER about abortion — not for us.  It was never about politics — not for us — and if you think this was a right-wing movement, you’re living in an echo chamber.

Standing With Brett was never about wanting him confirmed.  It was never about the Patriot Act, or about Donald Trump, or the myth of male privilege, and we aren’t the ones seeking to politicize sexual assault.

Standing With Brett boiled down to three things:

(1) Upholding the integrity of the judicial nomination process.

(2) A reaffirmation of due process.

(3) A rejection of the #metoo movement and its underlying feminist ideology.

No matter where any one of us happens to stand politically, THESE were the three things we held in common.

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