False Diagnoses

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I had Lyme disease a number of years ago, but my idiot doctor used an outmoded test when they were trying to figure out wtf was wrong with me, so I scored a false positive.

It went untreated for nearly a year after the onset of symptoms, to the point that it began to affect my brain.  They thought I had MS.

The neurologist I was seeing wanted to try me on meds, so he ended up referring me to a colleague who specialized in it.  The MS specialist did some fresh bloodwork straight away — he never expected to find anything — and that’s how they finally figured out it was Lyme (along with a co-infection).

I knew a nurse whose daughter wasn’t so lucky.  She spent 10 years being medicated for MS until she had to move up north to live with her mother because she was no longer able to take care of herself, let alone her child.

Naturally, she needed a new neurologist.  The new guy realized right away that something didn’t add up, and they eventually ended up suing that first doctor for misdiagnosing her Lyme as MS.

I don’t know whatever came of the suit, but the woman’s life was permanently ruined — moreso by the MS drugs that the Lyme.

She was around my age.  Her son was around my son’s age. 🙁

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The War on Pain Management

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Private response to a Danielle Stella tweet:

There needs to be a congressional investigation into the tactics being used to prosecute — or rather PERSECUTE — specialists who prescribe pain medications.  The DOJ is having doctors testify in court who have ZERO experience treating the conditions for which these drugs are being prescribed, with many of them being hired to work as full-time consultants STRAIGHT OUT OF MED SCHOOL.‬

I have been fortunate that my neurologist is still willing to treat my pain, as his practice has otherwise ceased prescribing opioid medications.  Yet he cut my dosage IN HALF after two of his colleagues were sentenced to federal prison DESPITE ADHERING TO CDC GUIDELINES.

(He told me he had three daughters, two in college, and that he couldn’t afford to go to prison.)

The DOJ simply had their pets testify that certain patients COULD have been treated with lower doses than were prescribed, and in at least one case they claimed not enough alternative forms of pain management had been explored ‪before resorting to opioids.‬

The government is FLAGRANTLY interfering in our medical care in response to a media-manufactured crisis that politicians from BOTH sides of the aisle have eagerly exploited for the PR points.

Because who wouldn’t want to help addicts who so obviously became addicted ThRoUgH nO fAuLt Of ThEiR oWn?

The reality is that in almost every case of overdose, at least one other substance was involved, or the user had otherwise failed to take as directed — if they were even using these meds under a doctor’s’ supervision. And many of them weren’t.

it’s scary enough to face the prospect of socialized medicine, and what would happen to me if my cancer should return.  I underwent a series of unconventional surgeries that would certainly NOT have been covered under any government plan.

But I at least had opioids to manage my pain — which was so intense that they had to dose me even as I slept.  The recovery was brutal. Withdrawal from the intravenous dilaudid to get back on to tramadal truly sucked — every time.

The aftermath hasn’t been easy. Since my pain medication was cut in half, I went from being able to perform activities that most people take for granted — shopping, driving, keeping up with friends — to being housebound.

But what truly terrifies me is the prospect of the cancer returning, the government dictating my course of treatment and the extent to which I am deemed worthy of pain management.