Corruption & Cowardice in Congress

0

(Re the idea that the institutions are the problem):

I don’t think it’s the institutions, I think it’s the people.  It’s a combination of corruption and cowardice.

Take Congress.  Many of them are corrupt, but for the most part it’s small-scale corruption that most people wouldn’t bat an eye at.  But they refrain from calling out much greater levels of corruption because they know there would be retaliation.  Even if they haven’t done anything particularly awful, the groundwork will have been set for their lives and the lives of their families to be torn apart, either by malicious investigations or trained media vultures or angry constituents — but probably all of the above.

The ones who aren’t corrupt know to keep their heads down and not rock the boat, because the moment they blow the whistle, the horde will descend upon them, and they’ll be subjected to much of the same (if not identical) treatment as the corruption-lite ones above.

And then there is the big-corrupt.  For the reasons outlined above, they’re the safest.  And the more power they manage to acquire — either by trading favors or selling contracts or diverting funds — the safer they become.  They gain leverage over the people beneath them and use and discard them whenever necessary.

Whatever stories do mange to leak out — generally by the people over which they have oversight — are easily dismissed as wild smears or “conspiracy theories” (regardless of whether any conspiracy is actually implied), or else they get scooped up and embellished by people on the Internet to the point that they might as well feature big foot and bat boy and lizard people.

And then there are the truly evil people, like Adam Schiff.  Though hardly anyone ever reaches the level of Schiff.  He’s found ways to monetize, weaponize, and shield himself with the sensitive nature of the committee on which he sits and currently chairs.  But I don’t want to get into Schiff right now except to say that the guy doesn’t have TDS — he is a full-blown sociopath.  Highly intelligent and very dangerous.

Alphabet Overhaul

0

My hope is that Trump’s legacy will be the overhaul & reorganization of our intelligence agencies.  I think it’s coming (in some form or another) but that he’s waiting for his second term.  Here’s one way to do it:

If I were the bad orange man, my first order of business upon being reelected would be to fire the current DNI and appoint one who is fully on board with getting rid of the DNI — we just wouldn’t go public with that until after he’s been confirmed.

The next step would be to fire Wray and appoint a new FBI director.  Nothing personal — just need somebody fresh.  Preferably someone who hasn’t worked too closely with the FBI in the past.

The new director would assist in step three, which would be to reorganize the FBI.  Their purview is massive — break ’em up.  The agency responsible for investigating federal crimes does NOT belong functioning as an intelligence agency.  Let Homeland worry about domestic terrorism and the CIA handle foreign.

Step four would be the dissolution of the NSA.  Split their functions accordingly between the NRO, the CIA, and Homeland.

Step five?  Gut the CIA.  Specifically the Directorate of Support, which is the most massive of the five and has gradually been taking over by the same intersectional ideology plaguing our universities.  The function of the DOA should be mission support — that is all.

Trump will mostly have to carry this one out via executive order for a number of reasons.  I think the only reason he hasn’t handled it already is that he’s afraid of how it’ll look when he lays off thousands of black women — and no, I’m not being hyperbolic in the least.

After that, I’d deal with the House Democrats.  HPSCI doesn’t have nearly as much oversight as they like to pretend, quite simply because the House Dems have a culture of handling sensitive information carelessly, which allows their staffers to “innocently” leak things to the press and get away with it.

(If caught, they’ll quietly be dismissed, but I’ve heard of a few cases in which they were successfully prosecuted.)

It’s gotten so bad that people will routinely refuse to answer questions from the committee, even after they’ve been (emptily) threatened with contempt.

I’d force the DOJ to expend resources prosecuting even the mildest of leaks — including the congressmen themselves — until they got the fucking message and cleaned up their act.  If there’s going to be a House oversight committee — and I think there ought to be — then it shouldn’t be just for show.

The War on Pain Management

0

Private response to a Danielle Stella tweet:

There needs to be a congressional investigation into the tactics being used to prosecute — or rather PERSECUTE — specialists who prescribe pain medications.  The DOJ is having doctors testify in court who have ZERO experience treating the conditions for which these drugs are being prescribed, with many of them being hired to work as full-time consultants STRAIGHT OUT OF MED SCHOOL.‬

I have been fortunate that my neurologist is still willing to treat my pain, as his practice has otherwise ceased prescribing opioid medications.  Yet he cut my dosage IN HALF after two of his colleagues were sentenced to federal prison DESPITE ADHERING TO CDC GUIDELINES.

(He told me he had three daughters, two in college, and that he couldn’t afford to go to prison.)

The DOJ simply had their pets testify that certain patients COULD have been treated with lower doses than were prescribed, and in at least one case they claimed not enough alternative forms of pain management had been explored ‪before resorting to opioids.‬

The government is FLAGRANTLY interfering in our medical care in response to a media-manufactured crisis that politicians from BOTH sides of the aisle have eagerly exploited for the PR points.

Because who wouldn’t want to help addicts who so obviously became addicted ThRoUgH nO fAuLt Of ThEiR oWn?

The reality is that in almost every case of overdose, at least one other substance was involved, or the user had otherwise failed to take as directed — if they were even using these meds under a doctor’s’ supervision. And many of them weren’t.

it’s scary enough to face the prospect of socialized medicine, and what would happen to me if my cancer should return.  I underwent a series of unconventional surgeries that would certainly NOT have been covered under any government plan.

But I at least had opioids to manage my pain — which was so intense that they had to dose me even as I slept.  The recovery was brutal. Withdrawal from the intravenous dilaudid to get back on to tramadal truly sucked — every time.

The aftermath hasn’t been easy. Since my pain medication was cut in half, I went from being able to perform activities that most people take for granted — shopping, driving, keeping up with friends — to being housebound.

But what truly terrifies me is the prospect of the cancer returning, the government dictating my course of treatment and the extent to which I am deemed worthy of pain management.

Jelly Bean Amendment

0

I can’t be alone in wanting a Constitutional amendment restricting the sale of jelly beans to persons under the age of twenty-one.

This would allow for the creation of a new regulatory agency — one that would work closely with local law enforcement once the individual states have passed the necessary possession laws.

There’d be, like, grocery-store cops.  And no more late-night candy binges.

Who’s my congresswomanmanperson again?

I Endorse This Endorsement

0

I will be voting for [candidate] because I am tired of American politics being dominated by a #duopoly that has strayed too far from the founding principles of our society.

I will be *enthusiastically* voting for [candidate] because I believe he represents these principles, and that if elected he will remain as accessible to the individual citizens of his district as he has throughout his campaign.

(TRUE FACT: The existence of the incumbent is not a media hoax.)

Make no mistake — [candidate] is not some radical third-party candidate looking to arbitrarily slash government spending and legalize everything short of murder.  On the contrary, Mr. [candidate] is out to make our government operate more efficiently so we can all breathe a little easier.

How does he plan to accomplish this?  Not with empty rhetoric, but by eliminating wasteful spending and redirecting the Federal Government’s focus to federal issues.

(Please refer to Porter4Us.com, particularly the sections marked ‘Fiscal Policy’ and ‘Government Reform’.)

Which is not to say that [candidate] is without a few radical views.  He is, for instance, in favor of Congressional term limits.  (Who will speak for our career politicians?!) 😱  Which is not nearly as startling as his belief that the Second Amendment remains in effect and somehow pertains to private gun ownership.  (Wait, what??) 😱😱

But perhaps most radical of all is Mr. [candidate]’s position on Donald Trump. Directly from his website (TRIGGER WARNING):

“I will neither blindly support or oppose President Trump… I would stand up to President Trump when appropriate and support him on issues we agree on.” 😱😱😱

I will be voting for [candidate] in the upcoming election and hope you will too — if you aren’t too triggered by his radical views.