Alphabet Overhaul

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My hope is that Trump’s legacy will be the overhaul & reorganization of our intelligence agencies.  I think it’s coming (in some form or another) but that he’s waiting for his second term.  Here’s one way to do it:

If I were the bad orange man, my first order of business upon being reelected would be to fire the current DNI and appoint one who is fully on board with getting rid of the DNI — we just wouldn’t go public with that until after he’s been confirmed.

The next step would be to fire Wray and appoint a new FBI director.  Nothing personal — just need somebody fresh.  Preferably someone who hasn’t worked too closely with the FBI in the past.

The new director would assist in step three, which would be to reorganize the FBI.  Their purview is massive — break ’em up.  The agency responsible for investigating federal crimes does NOT belong functioning as an intelligence agency.  Let Homeland worry about domestic terrorism and the CIA handle foreign.

Step four would be the dissolution of the NSA.  Split their functions accordingly between the NRO, the CIA, and Homeland.

Step five?  Gut the CIA.  Specifically the Directorate of Support, which is the most massive of the five and has gradually been taking over by the same intersectional ideology plaguing our universities.  The function of the DOA should be mission support — that is all.

Trump will mostly have to carry this one out via executive order for a number of reasons.  I think the only reason he hasn’t handled it already is that he’s afraid of how it’ll look when he lays off thousands of black women — and no, I’m not being hyperbolic in the least.

After that, I’d deal with the House Democrats.  HPSCI doesn’t have nearly as much oversight as they like to pretend, quite simply because the House Dems have a culture of handling sensitive information carelessly, which allows their staffers to “innocently” leak things to the press and get away with it.

(If caught, they’ll quietly be dismissed, but I’ve heard of a few cases in which they were successfully prosecuted.)

It’s gotten so bad that people will routinely refuse to answer questions from the committee, even after they’ve been (emptily) threatened with contempt.

I’d force the DOJ to expend resources prosecuting even the mildest of leaks — including the congressmen themselves — until they got the fucking message and cleaned up their act.  If there’s going to be a House oversight committee — and I think there ought to be — then it shouldn’t be just for show.

The War on Pain Management

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Private response to a Danielle Stella tweet:

There needs to be a congressional investigation into the tactics being used to prosecute — or rather PERSECUTE — specialists who prescribe pain medications.  The DOJ is having doctors testify in court who have ZERO experience treating the conditions for which these drugs are being prescribed, with many of them being hired to work as full-time consultants STRAIGHT OUT OF MED SCHOOL.‬

I have been fortunate that my neurologist is still willing to treat my pain, as his practice has otherwise ceased prescribing opioid medications.  Yet he cut my dosage IN HALF after two of his colleagues were sentenced to federal prison DESPITE ADHERING TO CDC GUIDELINES.

(He told me he had three daughters, two in college, and that he couldn’t afford to go to prison.)

The DOJ simply had their pets testify that certain patients COULD have been treated with lower doses than were prescribed, and in at least one case they claimed not enough alternative forms of pain management had been explored ‪before resorting to opioids.‬

The government is FLAGRANTLY interfering in our medical care in response to a media-manufactured crisis that politicians from BOTH sides of the aisle have eagerly exploited for the PR points.

Because who wouldn’t want to help addicts who so obviously became addicted ThRoUgH nO fAuLt Of ThEiR oWn?

The reality is that in almost every case of overdose, at least one other substance was involved, or the user had otherwise failed to take as directed — if they were even using these meds under a doctor’s’ supervision. And many of them weren’t.

it’s scary enough to face the prospect of socialized medicine, and what would happen to me if my cancer should return.  I underwent a series of unconventional surgeries that would certainly NOT have been covered under any government plan.

But I at least had opioids to manage my pain — which was so intense that they had to dose me even as I slept.  The recovery was brutal. Withdrawal from the intravenous dilaudid to get back on to tramadal truly sucked — every time.

The aftermath hasn’t been easy. Since my pain medication was cut in half, I went from being able to perform activities that most people take for granted — shopping, driving, keeping up with friends — to being housebound.

But what truly terrifies me is the prospect of the cancer returning, the government dictating my course of treatment and the extent to which I am deemed worthy of pain management.