The Pledge of Allegiance

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I refused to say the Pledge of Allegiance.  The schools couldn’t legally force me to say it, but they tried to anyway.  Whatever my parents’ faults, they went to bat for me every time.  It was never a question of patriotism for me but a willingness to conform and obey.

At one point my dad announced a great victory: That I’d be allowed to leave out the “God” part. 🤦🏻‍♀️  He’d totally, totally, missed the point.

I don’t ever recall having used the ‘G’ word.  In elementary school I would simply mumble the pledge before I quit entirely.  Something about standing there, chanting in unison without really understanding what it was we were saying just made me super uncomfortable.

When I got older, it became the notion of the Pledge itself — rather than the delivery — that bothered me the most.  I love America, I think it is the greatest country in the world and (despite its many imperfections) that it has the greatest system of government ever conceived.

But I’m not willing to pledge to my allegiance to any state or nation or any symbol thereof.  I believe in loyalty to ideas.  To principles.  And even in junior high my word meant something to me, and I wasn’t about to make any pledge I didn’t mean.

My dad fought hard against the schools to allow me to simply stand for the Pledge.  Even that bothered me because the school was still trampling my 1st Amendment rights by insisting (yes, the SCOTUS has ruled on it), but I since I’d already been standing anyway, I wasn’t about to make a big deal of it.

Even after the administrators acquiesced, I was still prone to getting teachers and substitutes who would try to force me to say it anyway.  It was obnoxious.  They’d try all sorts of tactics, including denouncing me in front of my classmates for “disrespecting our military”.  Which was a disgusting charge.  They didn’t care about the troops.  All they cared about was conformity and obeisance.

I have zero problem with the Pledge being said in schools or public gatherings, but I do have a huge, huge problem with people being illegally forced to say it or subjected to harrassment when they refuse.

As a side note, the history of the Pledge is rather interesting and dripping with irony.  One could half-kiddingly describe Francis Bellamy as a National Socialist.  (Drops to one-quarter kiddingly when you factor in the salute.)

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Extremely Dangerous to Our Democracy

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The 1st Amendment is extremely dangerous to our democracy.  Pretty sure whoever wrote it never intended to excuse insensitive remarks about Sharia law or for it to be weaponized against persyns of non-binary gender.

“If You Don’t Vote…” STFU!

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That’s bullshit.  Part of having the right to vote is being able to choose when NOT to vote. You teach American government — you of all people should know this.

Do you honestly not see the problem with telling someone he can only express an opinion if he exercises his voting rights as YOU see fit?

There are plenty of registered Democrats who have vowed to stay home from the polls because they’re disgusted with their party.  They’re trying to sending a message, and they have EVERY right to complain.

I managed to leave off “without being lectured by an entitled sneuflake”.  But that’s totally how it should have ended.

This same person once had the audacity to suggest that Trump only won in 2016 because the people who voted for him didn’t know any better. 🙄

FACEBOOK: Due Process

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Response to friend:

You obviously haven’t been spending much time on social media — good for you.  The nut jobs are indeed demanding he be criminally investigated, and they’re being fueled by all sorts of re-shares claiming that it’s possible.

I’m a little stunned by your remark about due process — of course there is a need!  The “due process” being referred to is the presumption of innocence and the recognition that guilt must be based on evidence alone.

It means he has a right to confront these accusations, and to do so publicly without being told: “Shut up, you’re not allowed to speak!”

It means not forcing the man to “bear witness” against himself, the way the Left is trying to present his anger and tears as evidence that he is mentally unhinged.

It means not convicting a man on the basis of an accusation, when not a single shred of evidence has been presented.

This is absolutely about due process.  It a sense, that is the ONLY thing this is about.  The Constitution isn’t simply a piece of paper — it represents a set of values one would hope the vast majority of us still believe in, even if we can’t always agree on how they should be applied.

This is essentially the same battle going on right now over free speech, only framed in a different light.

Some people think the free exchange of ideas is a good thing, regardless of the merit of the particular ideas being exchanged.  Others believe there should be limits placed upon what is considered acceptable speech, but that such limitations should not come from the government.  And others do not believe in free speech at all.

More Social Media Censorship

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Update (10/01/18):

He was flagged by the DNC ! 😱


Back in July, actor James Woods tweeted out an utterly bland meme making fun of soy boys:

This past Friday, his account was locked, and Woods received a message stating that he wouldn’t be allowed back into his account until he deleted the offending tweet.

(Notice to Occupy Democrats: no more misleading memes that could potentially influence an election.)

Wood is refusing to delete the tweet, citing concerns over the growing number of individuals with non-leftist views who are being censored on social media.

And so @RealJamesWoods remains locked, because Twitter isn’t about to delete it for him.

Yes, it seems that unlike Facebook, Twitter expects users to actively participate in their own censorship.  Because Jack Dorsey believes in social responsibility.  Also: conditioning.

Read what James Woods has to say here.  Or click here to view the full Twitter thread.