Waves of Feminism

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For the record:

The “1st” wave was the suffragettes.  Not so much an ideology as a movement.

2nd-wave feminism happened around the seventies.  Started off as a movement, but quickly became infiltrated by cultural Marxists.  Would later be used to rationalize much of the third-wave feminist nonsense.

3rd-wave (“radical”) feminism started off with the riot girl scene — female punk rockers with little to no talent or concept of propriety.  It would eventually make its way to the universities to merge with what second-wave feminism had become (Womyn’s Studies) and the growing push for diversity and multiculturalism.

4th-wave feminism is characterized by intersectionality.  (Because multiculturalism wasn’t “diverse” enough.)  This one originated squarely in the universities with the feminist appropriation of LGBT issues and the advent of modern “Gender Studies”.

(“Gender Studies” actually used to refer to the branch of Womyn’s Studies that dealt with male/female relations.  Back when there were still only TWO genders.)

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Regressive Friends

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I grew up in the wealthiest county in America.  Doesn’t mean we were filthy rich (upper middle class), but I never lacked for anything that could be paid for in cash.

Most of my friends from junior high on came from extremely wealthy and/or influential families.  Hardly any of it was “old” money — most of my friends had at least one parent or grandparent who came from a working-class family.  Some of their parents immigrated here (legally) from impoverished nations.  One even came here as a refugee.

Parents generally want their children to have the best things in life.  These parents were no exception.

My friends were denied nothing. Many of them were given cellphones and credit cards before they were old enough to drive. 16th birthday present?  New car was standard.

Most of my friends went off to expensive private colleges.  Few of them lasted beyond the first couple of semesters.

The ones who did manage to finish college all have masters degrees in either social work or education.  Make of that what you will.

Those who left school generally remained unemployed throughout their twenties, still living off of (but not with) their parents.  Their parents paid their rent, their bills, and (unwittingly) for their drugs.  A few of them were gifted townhouses or fancy condos.

They couldn’t find jobs because they never bothered to look.  They advocated for universal healthcare because they knew it was only a matter of time before they’d be kicked off of their parents’ plans.

The girls got involved with left-wing activism early on because it was trendy to call yourself a feminist.  The guys got involved much later (around the time of Occupy Wall Street) once they realized prestige couldn’t be siphoned off as easily as cash.

We were the kids who were told we could be whatever we wanted to in life — regardless of race, sex, sexual orientation, or ethnicity.  We believed it, and we filled our heads with such wonderful dreams.

The part they left out was that those dreams wouldn’t simply be handed to us by some surrogate parental entity — we’d have to work towards them, and success is never a guarantee in life.

My friends aren’t stupid.  A lot of them are highly-intelligent people.  I think deep down they realize where they messed up, only the sense of shame is more than they can bear.

And so they fall back on their intelligence — see themselves as the enlightened, intellectual elite — as if IQ alone were something to be proud of.  (I have far greater respect for a mentally-challenged individual who can hold down a job than I have for a worthless genius.)

Disagree with them and you are ignorant.  Or bigoted.  Or simply blinded by your own privilege (or by a lack thereof).

It’s far easier to blame one’s own failures on an oppressive, capitalistic, patriarchal system than it is to re-examine one’s own life choices.  And it’s far easier to smear someone you disagree with as racist, sexist, homophobic, etc. than it is to address their ideas directly — particularly on issues of economics.

Which is why everyone right-of-left these days is automatically racist, sexist, homophobic, etc. — regardless of their race, sex, sexual orientation, etc.

 

[FACEBOOK] FGM Part II / Feminist Ideology

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(Part II of this.)


Feminism is an ideology.  If someone chooses to identify with an ideology — any ideology — it is reasonable to assume that they do so because they subscribe to that particular belief system.

In practice, people pick and choose which parts of an ideology they hold to.  That doesn’t mean the ideology transforms into whatever it is they want it to be.

The gals at Women’s Co were very much representative of feminism.  The main differences between then and now were that “diversity” and gender theory were still in the process of being woven in, and the leadership lay with the theorists themselves rather than politicians and celebrity advocates.

Which made for a number of conflicting ideas.  And it wasn’t always clear which ones took precedence.

[FACEBOOK] Female Genital Mutilation

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I started to respond to this post early this morning, only then I decided not to derail the conversation.  Not on this. But the Stan Lee thing has me sufficiently pissed that I’m posting this on my own wall.

I got mixed up with feminism in college.  I gradually figured out what they were really about, but I stuck around anyway for reasons that would only make sense to an 18-year-old.

The final straw came after somebody in Women’s Co gave a presentation on female genital mutilation.

It was accurate and well presented.  Everyone made the appropriate noises of indignation, and the talking stick (or whatever the hell it was called) was passed around so we could all take turns virtue signaling our disapproval.

Everything went pretty much as you would have expected. That is, until the stick reached the last girl, who reminded us of our duty to be respectful of other cultures.

One by one, “minds” changed.

I used to compare it to the Wave at a sporting event — the way the same blank expression seemed to slide from one face to the next.

I now realize that the most accurate way of explaining what happened is in terms of the NPC meme.  As soon as the command ‘cultural lens’ was initiated, the moral relativity programming clicked in, and even the girl who gave the presentation had little choice but to agree that WE had no right to judge.

That was it for me. I was finished.  Feminism is an evil ideology rooted in Marxism and hate and has NOTHING to do with gender equality.


👉 PART II 👈


Email to Awesome Journalist Dude

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Hi, [Awesome Journalist Dude].  Fan here.  There’s something I hope you will look into, because it helps explain a lot of false accusations and why sex assault is (supposedly) so underreported: What feminists actually mean when they talk about sexual assault.

A good place to start would be with ‘sexual violence’.  It’s a catch-all term feminists employ because it allows them to make a lot of false equivocations.

Sexual violence can entail anything from a “verbal assault” (which includes catcalling) or sexual harassment (includes unwelcome flirtation) to rape — which isn’t necessary ‘rape’ in any conventional sense.  Rather, ‘rape’ can refer to any sex act that fails to meet the feminist criteria for consent.

You’re probably aware of the term ‘affirmative consent’, but did you know that feminist ideology permits a woman’s ‘yes’ to be nullified AFTER the fact if she decides she didn’t really mean it?

Consent can also be revoked if the sex didn’t go according to her expectations, or if she suffers from any mental illness (e.g., bipolar disorder) and later concludes it had affected her judgement.

I was involved with radical feminism in my late teens, and nearly every girl I associated with had “attacker” stories to tell. And these she-roes were eager to tell everyone BUT the cops, complaining our laws simply weren’t strong enough to prosecute their “attackers”.  In that much, they were correct.

FACEBOOK: What Supporting Kavanaugh Was Really About

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All right, everyone — listen up, because an astonishing number of you don’t seem to understand the overwhelming support behind Brett Kavanaugh, or how the SCOTUS confirmation process even works.

The President can nominate whomever he damn well pleases, and it’s up to the Senate whether or not to confirm.  There isn’t an ideological litmus test, and it doesn’t matter how “mainstream” a nominee is, because the Supreme Court does not exist to represent YOUR interests OR mine.  The only “interests” it represents are those of the United States Constitution.   (Worth noting: Brett Kavanaugh is an utter caricature of Middle America.)

The only relevant concern is whether the nominee is capable of doing the job.

Think he lacks the experience to fill a seat?  Fine.  Think he doesn’t understand the Constitution, or how to properly apply it?  That’s fine too.  Have concerns about the candidate’s ethics, or do you otherwise question whether he can and will remain objective in his rulings?  Then certainly, Senator, you should vote ‘no’.

But please, all of you screaming your heads off about Roe v. Wade — shut the fuck up already.  You don’t actually believe Trump can be pressured into nominating someone who supports abortion; you’re just looking for an excuse to bitch about Trump.

If you had any serious concerns about Kavanaugh’s confirmation, you belonged taking them to your senator — not taking to the streets like savages or whining about it on social media.

(To anyone who contacted their senator’s office and THEN whined: 👍  But I hope they had the good sense to ignore you unless you actually had something constructive to say.)


Secondly:

I’m tired of all the mischaracterizations of Kavanaugh supporters, and of people reframing the issues around irrelevant topics instead of challenging our arguments directly.

This was NEVER about abortion — not for us.  It was never about politics — not for us — and if you think this was a right-wing movement, you’re living in an echo chamber.

Standing With Brett was never about wanting him confirmed.  It was never about the Patriot Act, or about Donald Trump, or the myth of male privilege, and we aren’t the ones seeking to politicize sexual assault.

Standing With Brett boiled down to three things:

(1) Upholding the integrity of the judicial nomination process.

(2) A reaffirmation of due process.

(3) A rejection of the #metoo movement and its underlying feminist ideology.

No matter where any one of us happens to stand politically, THESE were the three things we held in common.

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