RE: Civil War

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It was definitely about slavery.  Not so much in existing states — at least not directly.  What it boiled down to was whether future states admitted into the Union would be free or slave because they feared an imbalance would end up threatening the institution as a whole.‬

‪The South’s economy was slave based, so naturally that would have been their chief concern (just look at the post-war economic collapse), but culture definitely played a substantial role as well.  The antebellum lifestyle was simply unsustainable after slavery had been abolished.‬

‪Where the question of self determination comes in is with regard to whether the states could legally secede, and even more to the point, whether the federal government had the authority to STOP them from leaving.  And that’s a subject that continues to be debated to this day.‬

Sargon Nails It

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One hundred percent with Sargon on this.  It’s important to learn about the Holocaust (along with other horrific events in human history), but the idea of collectivized, transgenerational victimhood is equally absurd as collectivized, transgenerational guilt.  There are Jewish people and people of Jewish ancestry who quite literally fetishize the Holocaust, and that’s fucking sick.

As I’ve said before, the victims of the Holocaust weren’t the Jews.  The victims of the Holocaust were people, a large number of whom happened to be Jewish.

I also like that he calls out the almost exclusively American concept of a white/European identity.  It’s completely retarded, because there is no single European identity.  Europe comprises 51 different counties, many of which are home to multiple ethnic groups.  Even the most die-hard EU supporter will grant you that.

Yes, National Socialism is Socialism 🤦🏻‍♀️

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Yes, National Socialism is REAL socialism.  It’s a political ideology.  The National Socialist German Workers’ Party was a political party founded by National Socialists, and under Hitler it would later adapt many of Mussolini’s economic policies.

The state controlled the means of production.  They simply employed certain measures allowing for the appearance of a market system, but instead of those “markets” being subject to market forces, they were controlled entirely by the government.

To put things in perspective: Under the New Economic Policy, the Soviets employed actual capitalistic measures.  Does that mean the Soviets were not socialists — or that the Soviet Union was “far right”? 🤔🤔🤔

The Pledge of Allegiance

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I refused to say the Pledge of Allegiance.  The schools couldn’t legally force me to say it, but they tried to anyway.  Whatever my parents’ faults, they went to bat for me every time.  It was never a question of patriotism for me but a willingness to conform and obey.

At one point my dad announced a great victory: That I’d be allowed to leave out the “God” part. 🤦🏻‍♀️  He’d totally, totally, missed the point.

I don’t ever recall having used the ‘G’ word.  In elementary school I would simply mumble the pledge before I quit entirely.  Something about standing there, chanting in unison without really understanding what it was we were saying just made me super uncomfortable.

When I got older, it became the notion of the Pledge itself — rather than the delivery — that bothered me the most.  I love America, I think it is the greatest country in the world and (despite its many imperfections) that it has the greatest system of government ever conceived.

But I’m not willing to pledge to my allegiance to any state or nation or any symbol thereof.  I believe in loyalty to ideas.  To principles.  And even in junior high my word meant something to me, and I wasn’t about to make any pledge I didn’t mean.

My dad fought hard against the schools to allow me to simply stand for the Pledge.  Even that bothered me because the school was still trampling my 1st Amendment rights by insisting (yes, the SCOTUS has ruled on it), but I since I’d already been standing anyway, I wasn’t about to make a big deal of it.

Even after the administrators acquiesced, I was still prone to getting teachers and substitutes who would try to force me to say it anyway.  It was obnoxious.  They’d try all sorts of tactics, including denouncing me in front of my classmates for “disrespecting our military”.  Which was a disgusting charge.  They didn’t care about the troops.  All they cared about was conformity and obeisance.

I have zero problem with the Pledge being said in schools or public gatherings, but I do have a huge, huge problem with people being illegally forced to say it or subjected to harrassment when they refuse.

As a side note, the history of the Pledge is rather interesting and dripping with irony.  One could half-kiddingly describe Francis Bellamy as a National Socialist.  (Drops to one-quarter kiddingly when you factor in the salute.)

The ADL is a Professional Hate Group

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I fucking hate the ADL.  They exist for one purpose only, and that’s to promote censorship.  They thrive on Antisemitism (legit or otherwise), along with every other form of discrimination (in recent years they have branched out).

These people are in the business of CREATING hate.  If they actually cared about Antisemitism they would support the free exchange of ideas instead of seeking to silence anyone, including Jews (the very people they claim to be protecting) whose views run contrary to the narrative they are trying to push.

The ADL doesn’t care about helping Jews the same way feminists don’t actually give a shit about women.  When it suits their agenda to use them, they’ll use them.  If not, they’ll discard them.

I keep saying this again and again: Antisemitism — both real and imagined — is the ADL’s bread and butter.  Their continued existence depends on the very hatred they claim to be fighting.  Which is why when the supply dwindles, they have to create more of it.  Who profits every time some maniac shoots up a synagogue?  The ADL and other professional hate organizations like the SPLC.

These professional hate groups WANT to push people over the edge.  They promote the far-left conspiracy theory that America is becoming an increasingly worse place for women and minorities, when nothing could be farther from the truth.  And the media indulges them because anger and fear generates clicks.  They gain viewers, subscribers, and social media shares.

Hate has become a very profitable profession, and the particular brand of hatred being peddled has the power to influence elections and ultimately decide the fate of nations.

These professional hate groups have joined forces with the mainstream media to wage a war against the most institutionally-discriminated again group in America: heterosexual white males.  The constant onslaught of racist, sexist rhetoric from these groups (and from bigoted journos and TV hosts like Sarah Jeong, Talia Levin, and Don Lemon) has two purposes:

(1) To push already unstable individuals over the edge to commit acts of violence

(2) To scare minorities and sympathetic “allies” into voting for Democrats

Every new attack reinforces their “white men are the biggest terror threat in this county” narrative, and the donations come flooding in.  The campaign contributions come flooding in.  The media can afford to pay their people instead of laying them off en masse.

I’m just going to close by saying that although plenty has been said about YouTube going full blitzkrieg on WWII history because Nazis, not enough attention is being paid to the ADL’s role in all this.

Waves of Feminism

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For the record:

The “1st” wave was the suffragettes.  Not so much an ideology as a movement.

2nd-wave feminism happened around the seventies.  Started off as a movement, but quickly became infiltrated by cultural Marxists.  Would later be used to rationalize much of the third-wave feminist nonsense.

3rd-wave (“radical”) feminism started off with the riot girl scene — female punk rockers with little to no talent or concept of propriety.  It would eventually make its way to the universities to merge with what second-wave feminism had become (Womyn’s Studies) and the growing push for diversity and multiculturalism.

4th-wave feminism is characterized by intersectionality.  (Because multiculturalism wasn’t “diverse” enough.)  This one originated squarely in the universities with the feminist appropriation of LGBT issues and the advent of modern “Gender Studies”.

(“Gender Studies” actually used to refer to the branch of Womyn’s Studies that dealt with male/female relations.  Back when there were still only TWO genders.)

Liberty’s Kids

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I recently recommended this to the guy who turned me on to American history back in hi skool:

It’s an animated series about the American Revolution, as seen through the eyes of three kids — an Amer’kin, a Brit, and a Frenchie. My kid loves it, and so do I.

It does a great job of presenting the war from ALL sides — not just the mainstream American and British perspectives — and it doesn’t shy away from sneuflake-triggering issues such as slavery, the treatment of free blacks, and the oppression of civilians who remained loyal to the crown.

But it also paints a very noble picture of what the Patriots were trying to accomplish, even during such times when they clearly stray from those goals.

And the level of detail is astonishing. I highly, highly recommend. ❤️

My Father the Hero

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Yesterday I ventured out into the great outdoors — as opposed to the lesser outdoors between my front door and the top of the stairs, which I visit regularly while seeing my kid off to school.

There was a thing for my dad, and a lot of relatives showed up, including a few I had not even known existed whom I am related to in ways that remain as lost to me as their names.

There was a lady who was not actually a relative, but is nevertheless considered more of a relative than most blood relatives — who aren’t actually MY blood relatives because I am in fact adopted.  (Also a Russian bot.)  She fussed over me and held my water bottle, and for this service I shall remain eternally grateful.

There were cake pops, exactly two dozen of which I managed to take home with me because red velvet and white chocolate were being heavily discriminated against.  (NOTE: The red velvets proved unworthy of rescue.)

There were also over a hundred people who were even less related to me than the cake pops and relatives.  None of these people were Russian bots; all of them had gathered to honor my dad in ways I never would have imagined possible.

I learned yesterday that my dad is a hero — a legitimate American hero.  The stories I heard about him were so incredible, I am still struggling to process it all.

Never in a million years would I have guessed the extent of what he’s managed to accomplish in his forty-two-plus year career; never would I have thought my dad capable of inspiring so many damned people.

What they’ve credited him with is truly astonishing.

To be told that my dad is mononymous within his field feels amazing, but also a little strange.

Still, it goes a long way toward explaining the behavior of people who used to come up to me and introduce themselves, then continue to stand there staring at me as if there were something remaining to be said.  I used to think they were hitting on me, until I finally concluded that my dad simply favored hiring the socially awkward, possibly for reasons of national security.

I’m looking forward to reading the books they say will one day be written about him.  The knowledge that my dad will someday be mentioned in the same breath as people I’ve only read about truly blows my mind.

My Thoughts on 9/11

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In Europe, people are afraid to call out Islamic terrorism for fear of being targeted — or otherwise violating some ridiculous “hate speech” law, resulting in fines or even imprisonment.

In America, we’re afraid to call out Islamic terrorism for fear of being labeled “racist”.

The verdict?  The terrorists won.  And Islamic terrorism is going to keep on winning unless we can agree to speak openly and honestly about it without fear of unwarranted reprisals.

This doesn’t mean we need another round of Team America World Police or any further invasions of our privacy.

What it does mean is not being afraid to identify the motives of people who have dedicated themselves to the destruction of an entire civilization.  It means recognizing religious extremism for what it is rather than drawing from an arsenal of ad hominems, red herrings, and false equivocations whenever someone proves bold enough to raise the subject.

It means recognizing that while Christians have indeed been responsible for some of the worst atrocities in human history — and Hindu extremists seem poised to slaughter Muslims over every little religious beef (lol plz) — the predominant form of religious terrorism the world faces today is Islamic.

It also means recognizing that condemning radical Islam does not make one Islamophobic.  (Nor a racist, seeing how we’ve managed to extend the concept of race further than any other society in human history.)

Why aren’t we as willing to identify acts of Islamic terrorism as we are so-called “hate crimes”?  Is it somehow more acceptable to despise an entire civilization, rather than an ethnicity or skin color?

If so, would it not follow that the man who kills a stranger over the color of his skin is somehow LESS guilty than the man who kills over a personal grudge?

Facts may be swept under the rug to keep our Safe Spaces looking pristine, but Reality has a way of creeping up behind us.  And sooner or later, Reality will sweep the rug right out from under our feet.

To those who seek to hold Western Civilization responsible for Islamic terrorism:

Can you imagine blaming the Jews for the Holocaust?

Can you imagine blaming the slaves for the bloodiest war in our nation’s history?

Was the rape victim “asking for it” because of the manner in which she dressed?

If you answered ‘no’ to all three questions, then you likely hail from a modern, liberal society — be you from the East or the West.  For this very reason, there are people who would like to see you dead.

We need to stop whitewashing the past and present for fear of offending Muslims — most of whom don’t have a goddamned thing to do with terrorism anyway.

And to anyone looking to blame the Western world for the overall violence in the Middle East: I encourage you to open a history book, because the Middle East has been a hotbed of violence since the dawn of civilization.  It predates Israel, it predates America — it even predates Islam.