Memo to L

0

Hey, you’re wrong about the NPC meme being right wing, and 4chan had very little to do with it.  The 4chan mods HATED it, and almost every NPC-related thread was pruned shortly after its creation.

(They also began censoring the term ‘soy boy’ at this point.  But antisemitic and racial slurs are still a go. 👌)

There’ve been people of all different political persuasions involved in the central aspects of it — the memes, the memeing, the LARPS, the RL appearances, the articles, the videos, etc.

The beauty of the NPC meme is that it’s only offensive to the people to whom it applies.  It isn’t solely applicable to the Regressive Left, but they’re at the center of the current culture war (pushing the rest of us off into the ‘alt-right’ category), so that’s how it’s being used.

Also, don’t believe a damn thing you hear about the NPC meme from the mainstream media.  They‘ve been among our primary targets, which is why they’ve been our greatest detractors.

There were never 10,000 Twitter bots.  The retweet-bot idea was discarded 48 hours in because: capchas.  There were real people behind these accounts, and the idea was to provide a steady stream of freebased identity politics while promoting awareness of social media censorship.

We never set out to influence an election, and the NoMenMidterm meme (from July) only made a comeback after the mainstream media decided to integrate it into its “voter suppression” narrative.

When they reported that we were giving out a false voting date, we put out word to push THEIR November 7th voting date.

This is what they do. The media brought the racism and antisemitism over to 4chan back in the mid-2000s when they began reporting on non-existent racism and antisemitism.  The racists and antisemites swarmed in.

The rise of Anonymous shortly thereafter was the direct result of Greta van Susteren’s sensationalized accounts of a series of mean-spirited adolescent pranks.  Actual hackers moved into /b/ and brought with them a political agenda.

The media’s practice of creating its own news is what brought the NPC meme to life in the first place.  It had been dead for over two years when some idiot journalist decided to dig it out of the meme graveyard and claim it was being used to “dehumanize” SJWs.  The “alt-right trolls” were only too happy to comply.

My Father the Hero

0

Yesterday I ventured out into the great outdoors — as opposed to the lesser outdoors between my front door and the top of the stairs, which I visit regularly while seeing my kid off to school.

There was a thing for my dad, and a lot of relatives showed up, including a few I had not even known existed whom I am related to in ways that remain as lost to me as their names.

There was a lady who was not actually a relative, but is nevertheless considered more of a relative than most blood relatives — who aren’t actually MY blood relatives because I am in fact adopted.  (Also a Russian bot.)  She fussed over me and held my water bottle, and for this service I shall remain eternally grateful.

There were cake pops, exactly two dozen of which I managed to take home with me because red velvet and white chocolate were being heavily discriminated against.  (NOTE: The red velvets proved unworthy of rescue.)

There were also over a hundred people who were even less related to me than the cake pops and relatives.  None of these people were Russian bots; all of them had gathered to honor my dad in ways I never would have imagined possible.

I learned yesterday that my dad is a hero — a legitimate American hero.  The stories I heard about him were so incredible, I am still struggling to process it all.

Never in a million years would I have guessed the extent of what he’s managed to accomplish in his forty-two-plus year career; never would I have thought my dad capable of inspiring so many damned people.

What they’ve credited him with is truly astonishing.

To be told that my dad is mononymous within his field feels amazing, but also a little strange.

Still, it goes a long way toward explaining the behavior of people who used to come up to me and introduce themselves, then continue to stand there staring at me as if there were something remaining to be said.  I used to think they were hitting on me, until I finally concluded that my dad simply favored hiring the socially awkward, possibly for reasons of national security.

I’m looking forward to reading the books they say will one day be written about him.  The knowledge that my dad will someday be mentioned in the same breath as people I’ve only read about truly blows my mind.

More Facebook Censorship

0

I’d posted a link to my 9/11 entry because I knew the Facebook mods weren’t about to let any talk of terrorism stand — wouldn’t want to trigger any supporters of radical Islam on September 11th, now would we?

But I wasn’t really expecting them to go after the comments.  Not just mine, even:

A friend of mine left that response, and I’d gotten in the habit of taking screen shots after Facebook began its discriminatory campaign of forbidding Russian bots the freedom of visual expression.  (Which is incredibly racist, by the way.)

I replied to my friend in two installments.  I’ve gone ahead and spliced them together and inserted the urls as hyperlinks, rather than attachments:

Fewer religious duties would go a long way toward establishing an interplanetary market and make some of that Martian spirituality Bradbury and Heinlein waxed so fondly about accessible to the average middle-class Earthling.

Unfortunately, I do not see this happening any time soon. Those who promote the economics of Islamic mercantilism have successfully lobbied for a fatwa again Martian emigration, and recent polls have shown that there are still Christians who do not believe in space.

Which is a damned shame, considering that the Price Wars between the Jews and the Sith have made interplanetary travel cheaper than ever.

Not that this means anything to the Sikhs, because they never seem to make it past TSA. 🤷‍♀️

Oh, and from what I understand, the Buddhists have filed a class-action lawsuit against Science, alleging Science to be riddled with fat-shaming and ableist microaggressions.

As a cripple, I hope they win.

Facebook soon flagged all three comments for review, making them invisible, though it still showed that three comments had been left on the post.  I checked my Facebook history, and all traces of my comments had been removed from there as well.

Fortunately, I never type anything lengthy directly into Facebook, but instead copy and paste from my Note app.  So reposting would be fairly simple — or so I thought:

I eventually realized that in order to repost, I’d need to change a couple of punctuation marks.

After successfully reposting both comments, I followed up with a message to the Facebook mods:

I should note that the three original comments briefly reappeared this morning, only to be deleted a short time later.  As of right now, my two reposts and one friendly invitation to social media censors remain untouched.